20+ Cartoon Artist – Cartoon Tattoo Artist

Discover some of the best famous cartoon artists and cartoon tattoo artist in the world that draws perfectly.

Who’s A Cartoon Artist?

An artist is a person engaged in an activity related to creating art, practicing the arts, or demonstrating an art.

The common usage in both everyday speech and academic discourse refers to a practitioner in the visual arts only.

However, the term is also often used in the entertainment business, especially in a business context, for musicians and other performers (although less often for actors). “Artiste” (French for artist) is a variant used in English in this context, but this use has become rare.

Use of the term “artist” to describe writers is valid, but less common, and mostly restricted to contexts like used in criticism.

20+ Famous Cartoon Artist / Cartoon Tattoo Artist

Cartoon Artist
Famous Cartoon Artist

• Mark Machado

Mark Machado (born May 18, 1970, in Los Angeles) better known as Mr. Cartoon or more commonly just Cartoon, is an American cartoon tattoo artist and graffiti artist based in Los Angeles, California.

Since the age of eight, Mr. Cartoon realized he was an artist and went on his first paying art job at the age of twelve.

Having grown up in the Harbor area of Los Angeles County, young Cartoon began airbrushing T-shirts and Lowrider cars before adopting the “Fineline Style” tattoo art style, which was developed in the California prison system.

• Herbert Lawrence Block

Herbert Lawrence Block, commonly known as Herblock (October 13, 1909 – October 7, 2001), was an American editorial cartoonist and author best known for his commentaries on national domestic and foreign policy.

During the course of a career stretching into nine decades, he won three Pulitzer Prizes for editorial cartooning (1942, 1954, 1979), shared a fourth Pulitzer Prize in 1973 for Public Service on Watergate, the Presidential Medal of Freedom (1994), the National Cartoonist Society Editorial Cartoon Award in 1957 and 1960, the Reuben Award in 1956, the Gold Key Award (the National Cartoonists Society Hall of Fame) in 1979, and numerous other honors.

• Marc Bell

Marc Bell (born 1971 in London, Ontario) is a Canadian cartoonist and artist. He was initially known for creating comic strips (such as Shrimpy and Paul), but Bell has also created several exhibitions of his mixed media work and watercoloured drawings.

Hot Potatoe , a monograph of his work, was released in 2009. His comics have appeared in many Canadian weeklies, Vice, and LA Weekly. He has been published in numerous anthologies, such as Kramers Ergot and The Ganzfeld.

• Berkeley

Guy Berkeley “Berke” Breathed ( born June 21, 1957) is an American cartoonist, children’s book author, director, and screenwriter, known for his comic strips Bloom County, Outland, and Opus. Bloom County earned Breathed the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning in 1987.

• Michael Judge

Michael Craig Judge (born October 17, 1962) is an American actor, animator, writer, producer, director and musician.

He is the creator of the animated television series Beavis and Butt-Head (1993–1997, 2011, 2021–present), and a co-creator of the television series King of the Hill (1997–2010), The Goode Family (2009), Silicon Valley (2014–2019), and Mike Judge Presents: Tales from the Tour Bus (2017–2018).

He also wrote and directed the films Beavis and Butt-Head Do America (1996), Office Space (1999), Idiocracy (2006), and Extract (2009).

• Martin Rowson

Martin Rowson (born 15 February 1959) is a British editorial cartoonist and writer. His genre is political satire and his style is scathing and graphic.

He characterises his work as “visual journalism”. His cartoons appear frequently in The Guardian and the Daily Mirror.

He also contributes freelance cartoons to other publications, such as Tribune, Index on Censorship and the Morning Star. He is chair of the British Cartoonists’ Association.

• Albert Uderzo

Alberto Aleandro Uderzo 25 April 1927 – 24 March 2020) was a French comic book artist and scriptwriter.

He is best known as the co-creator and illustrator of the Astérix series in collaboration with René Goscinny.

He also drew other comics such as Oumpah-pah, again with Goscinny. Uderzo retired in September 2011.

• Morton Walker

Addison Morton Walker (September 3, 1923 – January 27, 2018) was an American comic strip writer, best known for creating the newspaper comic strips Beetle Bailey in 1950 and Hi and Lois in 1954. He signed Addison to some of his strips.

• Benjamin Marra

Benjamin Marra (born 1977 in Halifax, Nova Scotia) is a Grammy-nominated American illustrator and comic-book artist.

His work has been mostly self-published under his own imprint, Traditional Comics, and mainly consists of black and white comics, printed on low-quality paper for a relatively low price.

His drawing style is reminiscent of such artists as Paul Gulacy, Herb Trimpe and Spain Rodriguez, as well as the work of pinball machine graphic illustrators.

• Jeff Smith

Jeff Smith (born February 27, 1960) is an American cartoonist. He is best known as the creator of the self-published comic book series Bone.

• Aaron McGruder

Aaron Vincent McGruder (born May 29, 1974) is an American writer, cartoonist, and producer best known for creating The Boondocks, a Universal Press Syndicate comic strip and its animated TV series adaptation for which he was the creator, executive producer, and head writer.

• Art Young

Arthur Henry Young (January 14, 1866 – December 29, 1943) was an American cartoonist and writer.

He is best known for his socialist cartoons, especially those drawn for the left-wing political magazine The Masses between 1911 and 1917.

• Art Spiegelman

Art Spiegelman ( born on February 15, 1948) is an American cartoonist, editor, and comics advocate best known for his graphic novel Maus.

His work as co-editor on the comics magazines Arcade and Raw has been influential, and from 1992 he spent a decade as contributing artist for The New Yorker.

He is married to designer and editor Françoise Mouly, and is the father of writer Nadja Spiegelman.

• Al Jaffee

Allan Jaffee (born Abraham Jaffee March 13, 1921) is an American cartoonist. He is notable for his work in the satirical magazine Mad, including his trademark feature, the Mad Fold-in.

Jaffee was a regular contributor to the magazine for 65 years and is its longest-running contributor. In a 2010 interview, Jaffee said, “Serious people my age are dead.”

• George Cruikshank

George Cruikshank (27 September 1792 – 1 February 1878) was a British caricaturist and book illustrator, praised as the “modern Hogarth” during his life.

His book illustrations for his friend Charles Dickens, and many other authors, reached an international audience.

• Rasipuram Krishnaswami Laxman

Rasipuram Krishnaswami Laxman (24 October 1921 – 26 January 2015) was an Indian cartoonist, illustrator, and humorist.

He is best known for his creation The Common Man and for his daily cartoon strip, You Said It in The Times of India, which started in 1951.

• Bil Keane

William Aloysius Keane (October 5, 1922 – November 8, 2011), better known as Bil Keane, was an American cartoonist most notable for his work on the newspaper comic The Family Circus.

It began in 1960 and continues in syndication, drawn by his son Jeff Keane.

• André Franquin

André Franquin (3 January 1924 – 5 January 1997) was an influential Belgian comics artist, whose best-known creations are Gaston and Marsupilami.

He also produced the Spirou et Fantasio comic strip from 1947 to 1969, a period seen by many as the series’ golden age.

• Al Capp

Alfred Gerald Caplin (September 28, 1909 – November 5, 1979), better known as Al Capp, was an American cartoonist and humorist best known for the satirical comic strip Li’l Abner, which he created in 1934 and continued writing and (with help from assistants) drawing until 1977.

He also wrote the comic strips Abbie an’ Slats (in the years 1937–45) and Long Sam (1954).

He won the National Cartoonists Society’s Reuben Award in 1947 for Cartoonist of the Year, and their 1979 Elzie Segar Award, posthumously for his “unique and outstanding contribution to the profession of cartooning”.

Comic strips dealt with urban experiences in the northern states of the USA until the year Capp introduced “Li’l Abner”.

Although Capp was from Connecticut, he spent 43 years teaching the world about Dogpatch, reaching an estimated 60 million readers in more than 900 American newspapers and 100 more papers in 28 countries internationally.

M. Thomas Inge says Capp made a large personal fortune through the strip and “had a profound influence on the way the world viewed the American South”.

• Carl Barks

Carl Barks (March 27, 1901 – August 25, 2000) was an American cartoonist, author, and painter.

He is best known for his work in Disney comic books, as the writer and artist of the first Donald Duck stories and as the creator of Scrooge McDuck.

He worked anonymously until late in his career; fans dubbed him The Duck Man and The Good Duck Artist.

In 1987, Barks was one of the three inaugural inductees of the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame.

• E. C. Segar

Elzie Crisler Segar (December 8, 1894 – October 13, 1938), known by the pen name E. C. Segar, was an American cartoonist best known as the creator of Popeye, a pop culture character who first appeared in 1929 in Segar’s comic strip Thimble Theatre.

• Abner Dean

Abner Dean (18 March 1910 – 30 June 1982), born Abner Epstein in New York City, was an American cartoonist.

In allegorical or surrealist situations, Dean often depicted extremes of human behavior amid grim, decaying urban settings or barren landscapes.

His artwork prompted Clifton Fadiman to comment, “His pictures are trick mirrors in which we catch sight of those absurd fragments of ourselves that we never see in the smooth glass of habit.

• Jim Davis

James Robert Davis (born July 28, 1945) is an American cartoonist, television writer, television producer, screenwriter, and film producer.

He is best known as the creator of the comic strips Garfield and U.S. Acres. Published since 1978, Garfield is one of the world’s most widely syndicated comic strips.

• Hergé

Georges Prosper Remi (22 May 1907 – 3 March 1983), known by the pen name Hergé), from the French pronunciation of his reversed initials RG, was a Belgian cartoonist.

He is best known for creating The Adventures of Tintin, the series of comic albums which are considered one of the most popular European comics of the 20th century.

He was also responsible for two other well-known series, Quick & Flupke (1930–1940) and The Adventures of Jo, Zette and Jocko (1936–1957). His works were executed in his distinct ligne claire drawing style.

• Matthew Abram Groening

Matthew Abram Groening (born February 15, 1954) is an American cartoonist, writer, producer, and animator.

He is the creator of the comic strip Life in Hell (1977–2012) and the television series The Simpsons (1989–present), Futurama (1999–2003, 2008–2013, 2023), and Disenchantment (2018–present).

The Simpsons is the longest-running U.S. primetime-television series in history and the longest-running U.S. animated series and sitcom.

• Scott Adams

Scott Raymond Adams (born June 8, 1957) is an American author and cartoonist. He is the creator of the Dilbert comic strip and the author of several nonfiction works of satire, commentary, and business.

Dilbert came to national prominence during the downsizing period in 1990s America and reached a worldwide audience.

Adams worked in various business roles before he became a full-time cartoonist in 1995.

He writes in a satirical, often sarcastic way about the social and psychological landscape of white-collar workers in modern corporations.

• Gary Larson

Gary Larson (born August 14, 1950) is an American cartoonist, environmentalist, and former musician.

He is the creator of The Far Side, a single-panel cartoon series that was syndicated internationally to more than 1,900 newspapers for fifteen years.

The series ended with Larson’s retirement on January 1, 1995. In September 2019, his website alluded to a “new online era of The Far Side”.

On July 8, 2020, Larson released three new comics, his first in 25 years. His twenty-three books of collected cartoons have combined sales of more than forty-five million copies.

• Rube Goldberg

Reuben Garrett Lucius Goldberg (July 4, 1883 – December 7, 1970), known best as Rube Goldberg, was an American cartoonist, sculptor, author, engineer, and inventor.

Goldberg is best known for his popular cartoons depicting complicated gadgets performing simple tasks in indirect, convoluted ways.

The cartoons led to the expression “Rube Goldberg machines” to describe similar gadgets and processes.

Goldberg received many honors in his lifetime, including a Pulitzer Prize for political cartooning in 1948, the National Cartoonists Society’s Gold T-Square Award in 1955, and the Banshees’ Silver Lady Award in 1959.

He was a founding member and first president of the National Cartoonists Society, which hosts the annual Reuben Award, honoring the top cartoonist of the year and named after Goldberg, who won the award in 1967.

He is the inspiration for international competitions known as Rube Goldberg Machine Contests, which challenge participants to create a complicated machine to perform a simple task.

Above list are some of the Famous Cartoon Artist and cartoon tattoo artist in the world.

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